Google+

Great Depression

great depression

This photograph, taken by Dorothea Lange, was widely published and symbolized the Great Depression.

One Thursday afternoon in October 1929, a workman outside an upper floor window of a Wall Street office found himself staring into the eyes of four policemen. They reached out to catch hold of him. “Don’t jump!” shouted one of the policemen. “It’s not that bad.” “Who’s going to jump?” asked the surprised worker. “I’m just washing windows!”
To understand this incident we need to look at what had been happening in Wall Street in the months and years before that October afternoon in 1929.
Wall Street is the home of the New York Stock Exchange. Here dealers called stockbrokers buy and sell shares.
Owning shares in a business gives you the right to a share of its profits. But you can make money from shares in another way. You can buy them at one price and then, if the company does well, sell them later at a higher one.
More and more people were eager to get some of this easy money. By 1929, buying and selling shares had become almost a national hobby.

Like most other things in the United States in the 1920, you could buy shares on credit. Many people borrowed large sums of money from the banks to buy shares in this way. By the autumn of 1929 the urge to buy shares had become a sort of fever.
Yet some people began to have doubts. The true value of shares in a business firm depends upon its profits. But the profits of many American firms had been falling for some time.
If profits were falling, thought more cautious investors, then share prices, too, would soon fall. Slowly such people began to sell their shares. Day by day their number grew. Soon so many people were selling shares that prices did start to fall.
A panic began. On Thursday, October 24, 1929 — Black Thursday — 13 million shares were sold. On the following Tuesday, October 29 — Terrifying Tuesday — 16.5 million were sold.
By the end of the year the value of all shares had dropped by $40,000 million. Thousands of people were ruined. Some committed suicide. This was what the policemen thought that the window cleaner was doing.
This collapse of American share prices was known as the Wall Street Crash. It marked the end of the prosperity of the 1920s.
“What has gone wrong?” people asked. Some blamed the blindness of politicians, others the greed of investors and stockbrokers. But the most important course of the Wall Street Crash was that too few Americans were earning enough money to buy the goods that they themselves were producing.
The Crash made people uncertain about the future. Many decided to save any money they had instead of spending it on such things as new cars and radios. American factories were already making more goods than they could sell. Now they had even fewer customers.
By the end of 1921 nearly 8,000 million Americans were out of work. Many were soon without homes or food and had to live on charity. Millions spent hours in “breadlines”. Here they received free pieces of bread or bowls of soup, paid by the money collected from those who could afford it.
The Depression was easiest to see in towns, with their silent factories, closed shops and slowly moving breadlines. But it brought ruin and despair to farmlands too. Farmers simply couldn’t sell their produce. With the number of people out of work rising day by day, their customers in the cities could no longer afford to buy. If anyone did buy, it was at the lowest possible prices.
Many farmers grew desperate. They took out shotguns and banded together to drive away men who came to throw them off their farms for not paying their debts.
They paraded the streets in angry processions.
They waved placards with words such as: “In Hoover we trusted, now we are busted.”
By 1932 people of every kind — factory workers, farmers, office workers, store keepers — were demanding that President Hoover take stronger action to deal with the Depression.
Time and again in the early 1930s Hoover told people that recovery from the Depression was “just round the corner.” But the factories remained closed. The breadlines grew longer. People became hungrier.
Then, Frankin D. Roosevelt came on the scene. Roosevelt was the Governor of the state of New York. Years earlier he was crippled by polio. But in 1932 the Democratic Party chose him to run against President Hoover in that year’s election for a new president.
All over the United States anxious men and women felt that here at last was a man who understood their troubles, who sympathized with them — and, most important of all, who sounded as if he would do something to help them.
On a cold grey Saturday in March 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt took the oath as President of the United States. For a hundred days, from March 8 to June 16 he sent Congress a flood of proposals for the new laws. The American people had asked for action. In the “Hundred Days” Roosevelt gave it to them.

From An Illustrated History of the USA, by Bryn O’Callaghan, abridged.
Reprinted with kind permission of the Moscow Office of Addison Wesley Longman Ltd.

From Speak Out 2, 2001

Great Depression

Great Depression

Великая депрессия
В четверг днем в октябре 1929 года, рабочий за окном офиса на Уолл-стрит, находящегося на верхнем этаже, увидел четырех полицейских. Они пытались поймать его. «Не прыгай!», крикнул один из полицейских — «Все не так уж и плохо».
«Кто собирается прыгать?», спросил удивленный работник. «Я просто мою окна».
Чтобы понять этот инцидент, мы должны взглянуть на то, что происходило на Уолл-стрит в месяцы и годы до этого октябрьского дня 1929 года.
Уолл-стрит — дом Нью-Йоркской фондовой биржи. Здесь дилеры, называемые биржевыми маклерами, покупают и продают акции.
Владение акциями в бизнесе дается вам право на долю его прибыли. Но вы можете делать деньги на акциях по-другому. Вы можете купить их по одной цене, а затем, если дела у компании идут хорошо, продать их по более высокой цене.
Все больше и больше людей стремились получить эти легкие деньги. К 1929 году, покупка и продажа акций стала почти национальным хобби.
Как и большинство других вещей в Соединенных Штатах в 1920 году, можно было купить акции в кредит. Многие люди занимали в банках большие суммы денег, чтобы купить их. К осени 1929 года желание купить акции стало своего рода лихорадкой.
Тем не менее, некоторые люди начали сомневаться. Истинная ценность акций торговой фирмы зависит от ее доходов. Но прибыль многих американских фирм падала в течение некоторого времени. Если прибыль снижалась, думали более осторожные инвесторы, то цены на акции, тоже скоро упадут. Медленно такие люди начали продавать свои акции. Изо дня в день их количество росло. Вскоре очень многие люди продавали акции, и цены действительно начали падать.
Началась паника. В четверг, 24 октября 1929 — черный четверг — 13 миллионов акций были проданы. В следующий вторник, 29 октября — Ужасающий вторник было продано 16 500 000.
К концу года стоимость всех акций упала на 40 000 млн. долларов. Тысячи людей были разорены. Некоторые покончили жизнь самоубийством. Именно об этом подумали полицейские, когда увидели мойщика окон.
Это падение американских цен на акции было известно как Авария на Уолл-стрит. Она положила конец процветанию 1920-х годов.
«Что пошло не так?», спрашивали люди. Некоторые обвиняли слепоту политиков, другие жадность инвесторов и биржевых маклеров. Но дело было в том, что слишком мало американцев зарабатывали достаточно денег, чтобы купить товары, которые они сами производили.
Из-за Аварии люди были неуверены в будущем. Многие решили сэкономить имеющиеся деньги вместо того чтобы потратить их на такие вещи, как новые автомобили и радио. Американские заводы уже изготовили больше товаров, чем смогли продать. Теперь у них было еще меньше клиентов.
К концу 1921 года почти 8 000 миллионов американцев остались без работы. Многие из них были вскоре без крова и пищи, и им пришлось жить на благотворительность. Миллионы людей часами проводили в очереди безработных за бесплатным питанием. Здесь они получали бесплатный хлеб и миску супа, оплачиваемые теми, кто мог себе это позволить.
Легче всего Депрессию можно было увидеть в маленьких городах, с их молчаливыми заводами, закрытыми магазинами и медленно движущимися очередями за бесплатным хлебом. Но она также принесла разорение и сельскохозяйственным угодьям. Фермеры просто не могли продать свою продукцию. Число безработных росло изо дня в день, их клиенты в городах уже не могли позволить себе покупать. Если кто-то делал покупку, то она была по самым низким ценам.
Многие фермеры впали в отчаяние. Они взялись за ружья и объединились, чтобы отогнать людей, которые пришли забрать их фермы за долги.
Гневные процессии маршировали по улицам.
Они размахивали плакатами с такими лозунгами, как: «Мы верили в Гувера (31й президент США), теперь мы разорены».
К 1932 году все люди – рабочие, фермеры, служащие, владельцы магазинов — требовали, чтобы президент Гувер принял более решительные меры для борьбы с депрессией.
Снова и снова в начале 1930-х годов Гувер говорил людям, что выход из депрессии «буквально за углом». Но заводы оставались закрытыми. Очереди за бесплатным хлебом увеличивались. Люди стали голоднее.
Затем, на сцене появился Франклин Рузвельт. Он был губернатором штата Нью-Йорк. Несколькими годами ранее он был искалечен полиомиелитом. Но в 1932 году Демократическая партия избрала его в качестве оппонента президенту Гуверу на выборах нового президента того года.
На всей территории Соединенных Штатов, встревоженные мужчины и женщины, считали, что наконец-то появился человек, который понимал их проблемы и сочувствовал им – и, что самое главное, который говорил так, словно он сделает что-то, чтобы помочь им.
В холодную серую субботу марта 1933 года, Франклин Рузвельт принял присягу в качестве президента Соединенных Штатов. За сто дней, с 8 марта по 16 июня он послал в Конгресс поток предложений по новым законам. Американский народ просил действий. И за «Сто Дней» Рузвельт предоставил им это.

Великая депрессия

Великая депрессия