Google+




Key to the Door by Sergei Voronin

Key to the Door by Sergei Voronin

Key to the Door by Sergei Voronin


from the magazine NEVA
Sergei Voronin was born in 1913. After finishing a technical school at the Leningrad Metal Works, he became a turner, and then worked with geological expeditions, and in journalism. In 1947 his first volume of short stories was published. He has written a full- length novel, On His Own Soil and a shorter one, Unwanted Fame.

So that was all. . . All that was left to do was to close the door and take the key from the lock. Right until that moment she had still been hoping. Perhaps he would come. Just come to see how they were getting on. After all, between them there had been something that would never be forgotten.
The room was quite empty. It was time to go. It was a gloomy room, the sun came in only in early morning, and that was in summer, no other time of year … Then it shone in at 5 a.m. At first it lit up the right-hand side and then the whole room was filled with golden air.
“What’s the time,” he glanced at his watch.
It was five.
“Must you go?”
“It doesn’t really matter now …”
“Why not?”

“Just because…” He raised himself on his elbow and bent over her face. “You’re like an Indian. Quite a bronze complexion.”
“That’s the sun.” She smiled shyly and closed her eyes. He kissed her.
“Do you love me?” she asked, her eyes shut.
“Yes … And do you like me?”
“I love you!” It was she who said this, she who had never believed in love. She had laughed at her elder sister when she had spoken of love, hadn’t believed her because she herself had married without love. Pavel had gone down on his knees and cried . .. She had felt sorry for him. They had had a son, but she still could not love him. Pavel had been killed during the first few days of the war, yet she had not cried. She liked tall, powerfully built men, and Pavel was short and skinny. She only thought about him on rare occasions. And it was true that her mind was occupied by other things. They were cold and hungry, and the guns were barking. Corpses lay in the streets. . . It was as much as she could do to get to the maternity home. There her son was born. She had no milk and he cried and screamed . . . How he survived she did not know. She strained wet bread through butter muslin, heavy, blockade bread, she boiled dried carrots thanks to her brother-in-law, who got some from the commissariat. Vera came, his wife, that same elder sister who had talked about love. She brought some cereal and a handful of granulated sugar. The baby survived, and now he was two.
He would live, he would be like his father whom she had not loved .
But she loved this man. It had been love at first sight. The blockade had not been lifted. But it was summer and she was living with Vera, Vera’s children and her own little boy about 8 miles from Toksovo. She worked on a farm, and after the winter, after hunger and bitter cold, she suddenly found herself amidst sunshine, greenery and warmth. It was like a miracle.
In this tiny, forgotten village, the shells that fell in distant Leningrad were hardly heard. They lived in a biggish cottage — the two women and their three children. By that time Vera’s husband had also been killed. Vera immediately aged and could not look at her sister without hostility.
“It’s disgusting, the way the soldiers are always looking at you.”
But what could Asya do, if life coursed vigorously through her veins, if her eyes were as deep blue as the sky and she glowed with the happiness of life.
The military patrol used to march along the street past their cottage. Usually there were two soldiers. Sometimes they called in, and would ask, simply as an excuse for their visit: “Have you noticed anything suspicious around here?” And they would hand out sugar to the children.
“That’s quite unnecessary!” said Vera sternly.
Asya said nothing, and then the soldiers smiled, got out their tobacco pouches and had a smoke, taking Asya’s silence to mean that she was not of the same mind as her sister.
One day he came. A tall young man, with a cape thrown over his shoulders, and wearing a jauntily tilted forage-cap.
It was evening, and the sun was slowly sinking behind the blue silhouette of the woods, and there was a peaceful hush over the earth. The children were playing outside, and Asya was sitting on the bench by the gate with Vera. They had been working hard all day weeding, and now they were resting. He was walking along with another soldier, a puny little man like Pavel, but she did not recall her husband at that moment. She looked at the tall young man with the cape, and their glances met. He greeted her.
“It’s simply criminal to look the way you do,” Vera said. “You should be ashamed of yourself! No one would think there was a blockade on ..
“There is a blockade.”
“Or that your husband has been killed.”
“He has.”
The sun sank further and the sky was rosy. Across the pink expanse some black crows flew. They flapped their wings, and then everything became still quieter. The patrol reached the end of the village, and came back again,
“Let’s go in,” Vera said.
“I’ll sit here a bit longer.”
The patrol came abreast of them, “Good evening!” The tall young man said once again.
Vera got up ostentatiously and went in.
“Good evening,” Asya answered with a smile.
“You go on,” the tall boy said to the other.
The little soldier went off.
“May I?” The tall soldier asked.
“Please sit down.”
He sat down by her on the bench.
That was how they got acquainted. His name was Boris, Boris Mayevsky. He was an artist.
She had never believed in love, considering that it only existed in books and songs. And there she was, in love. He understood. She did not try to conceal anything. She realised that he liked her, she saw it in his eyes, big, lively, joyful eyes. He was easy to talk to. Whatever they talked about she found interesting. They discussed art — she was an educated girl and had trained as a teacher. She could talk about nature, which she loved. She loved everything that was dear to him. The only thing they did not talk about was the war and Pavel. But she told him about Pavel herself. It was the day she went into town for ration cards. They met on the way. Army lorries were passing by along the road, but military vehicles could not take civilians and Asya was walking to the station.
«Let me help you,” Boris said, raising his hand.
A lorry stopped, and they climbed into the cabin.
“But how . . . are you allowed to go into town?”
“They don’t like it very much, but if I don’t come who’s going to stop a lorry for you when you come home?”
The machine rocked and bumped, flinging them against one another. It was pleasant for both of them, and each pretended not to notice when their shoulders touched.
It was pleasant on the train, it moved very very slowly, stopping to let goods and troop trains through. There were not many people in the compartment and there was no one to prevent their gazing into each other’s eyes and saying anything that came into their heads.
Then they caught a tram and still went on talking and laughing, and the passengers looked at them, frowning and bewildered, for Asya and Boris seemed to come from some quite different world where there was no war, no fear, no pain, and no death.
The idea was that as soon as Asya had received her ration cards and got foodstuffs on them, they would go straight back. But instead they decided to go to Asya’s home in town and drink tea.
They spent the night there. She concealed nothing from him, telling him all about Pavel. But Pavel did not cast a shadow between them. For her it was as though Pavel had never existed. For Boris he had existed, but he was simply someone Asya had not loved.
“I love you,” said Boris. “I fell in love with you directly I saw you. I shall always love you wherever I am. And if I survive I’ll come back, and then we’ll be together, always together!”
He had a powerful voice, and powerful hands. He was broad- chested, with a big head and a strong mouth.
The room was dark. Suddenly the sun shone in. It was five in the morning.
“You’re like an Indian. Quite a bronze complexion,” he said. “That’s the sun . ..”
For his absence without leave Boris was sent off to a punishment battalion. “It’s just as well that I have a good commanding officer — I could have been sentenced as a deserter,” he wrote to Asya from the front.
In all his letters he wrote that he remembered her, he longed for her, and he loved her. She replied to him: “I love you, I long for you, I’m waiting for you!” Now, even Vera did not reproach her for her “indecent” beauty. Asya began to lose her looks — she was so afraid for him, and on top of that she was pregnant. She wrote and told him, and he was happy about it. “We are already across the Oder”, he wrote, “and before long we’ll be in Berlin. Look after yourself! I’ll be with you!”
She gave birth to a daughter. But there were no more letters. Had he been killed? Was he in hospital? She knew nothing. She simply suffered and waited. She waited every day, every hour, every minute. The first thing in the morning she was already waiting, when she ran in from her work she would look into the mail box but it was empty, always empty. She waited in the evenings. She would doze off still expecting a letter to arrive. It was the same every day, every hour, every minute.
The war came to an end. Everyone who had to return came home. But not Boris. Then she began to search for him. She sent out enquiries. Perhaps he was in a military hospital. Perhaps he lay somewhere crippled, afraid to remind her of his existence. But he was not in hospital. They traced him to Moscow. She was incredulous, and decided that it was someone else with the same name. When Vera went on one of her business trips to Moscow she asked her to go to the address to confirm that it was not her Boris.
Vera found the street, the block, the flat in which Boris Mayevsky lived. She rang the bell, and he opened the door himself. From the corridor came the sound of a baby crying.
“Excuse me, but does Ivanov live here?” Vera asked.
“No,” Boris Mayevsky replied. He did not recognise her, but Vera recognised him.
“Excuse me,” Vera said, and went away. Those were her instructions from Asya, to ring the bell, and to go away without revealing anything. “If it’s really him, then you mustn’t give any sign at all, he mustn’t guess that I am looking for him, but of course it can’t be him …”
“Why did he do it?” Asya kept asking herself after Vera’s return. “Why? Did he fall out of love with me? Didn’t he love me at all, was it because of the baby? But he was glad when he knew that I had had a daughter. He wrote to say so, but after that the letters stopped. But why, oh why?” Perhaps I seemed too superficial? Perhaps I seemed all right while the war was on, but once the war was over why should he want such a person? Of course, he decided I was too superficial. . . Probably he thought that if it hadn’t been him it would have been someone else . . . Probably that was it… And then there had already been Vovka, the son .. .
Asya no longer expected Boris to return as her husband, as the man who had taken her in his arms and spoken of love. She began to wait for him as the father of her daughter. Why didn’t he come? It wasn’t so far from Moscow to Leningrad, after all. Just one night on the train. Why didn’t he come to take a look at his daughter? Every day she was prepared for such a meeting. «Suppose he suddenly turns up?” She was always dressed as though he might appear at any moment. She did not want him to find the mother of his daughter looking slovenly and untidy. No, no, she would always be clean and tidy; even though her clothes were not exactly luxurious, they would be neat. She had a hard time of it bringing up the two children. No one helped her — the pension she got for Pavel was not very big, and she relied on her own efforts. And she had reason to be proud and hold her head high! She had done it all by her own efforts! She had taken a course and was working as a dispatcher in the factory. Previously she had been an unskilled worker on the conveyor belt. She got higher wages now and things were easier. She had more time for the children — she wasn’t so tired. She spent the evenings with them, and took them to concerts and theatres. No, he could turn up at any minute and she would have nothing to be ashamed of — either for herself or the children. Let him come…
Her son went off to do his army service. Her daughter entered college. The main thing had been achieved — she had brought the children up. He might still visit them, but she knew she did not want to see him. Then she had been 25, now she was nearly 50 … It was all in the past. But in that case it seemed all the stranger that he did not come. Why didn’t he just come out of good-heartedness? After all there had been something between them that would never be forgotten! In this very room he had spoken to her of love, had told her she looked like an Indian …
The room was quite empty. Everything had been taken out and loaded onto the van, Now she had only to remove the key from the lock and go off to the new flat, a flat in which he had never set foot and was not likely to …
«Mother, what are you doing?” Before her stood her daughter. Strong and tall, very much like her father. She looked impatiently at her mother. She was so like the father she had never seen — and what would it have cost him to come just once, out of a sheer human desire to see his daughter? He would see how she had brought their daughter up, and he would have had no cause to be ashamed of her.
«Mother, the driver says it’s time to go!”
«All right, I’m coming …”
For the last time she looked round the room: «And suppose he comes, and we’ve gone away? Perhaps I’ll leave the key in the door. He’ll go in and see that the room is empty and he will realise that we’ve moved. Then if he wants to it won’t be all that hard to find us …”
She left the key in the door.

«Ключ от двери» Сергея Воронина
из журнала Нева
Сергей Воронин родился в 1913 году. После окончания техникума он стал токарем на Ленинградском металлургическом заводе, а затем работал с геологическими экспедициями и занимался журналистикой. В 1947 году был опубликован первый том его рассказов. Он написал роман «На собственной земле» и более короткий, «Нежелательная слава».

Вот и все… Оставалось только закрыть дверь и вытащить ключ из замка. До этого момента она все еще надеялась. Возможно, он придет. Просто придет посмотреть как у них дела. В конце концов, между ними было что-то, что никогда не забудется.
Комната была совершенно пустой. Пришло время идти. Это была мрачная комната, солнце заглядывало только ранним утром, и это было летом, не в другое время года … Затем оно сияло в 5 часов утра. Сначала оно освещало правую сторону, а затем вся комната была заполнена золотым воздухом.
«Сколько время», он взглянул на часы.
Было пять.
«Ты должна идти?»
«Сейчас это не имеет большого значения …»
«Почему нет?»
«Просто потому, что …», он поднялся на локте и наклонился к ее лицу. «Ты как индианка. Совершенно бронзовый цвет лица».
«Это солнце». Она застенчиво улыбнулась и закрыла глаза. Он поцеловал ее.
«Ты меня любишь?», спросила она, закрыв глаза.
«Да … А я тебе нравлюсь?»
«Я люблю тебя!» Это сказала она, она, кто никогда не верила в любовь. Она смеялась над старшей сестрой, когда она говорила о любви, не верила ей, потому что она сама вышла замуж без любви. Павел упал на колени и заплакал. Она пожалела его. У них был сын, но она все еще не могла полюбить его. Павел был убит в первые дни войны, но она не плакала. Ей нравились высокие, сильные мужчины, а Павел был низким и худым. Она редко думала о нем, лишь в исключительных случаях. И было правдой, что ее ум был занят другими вещами. Они были холодными и голодными, и грохотали орудия. На улицах лежали трупы.… Все что она могла сделать, это добраться до родильного дома. Там родился ее сын. У нее не было молока, он плакал и кричал.… Как он выжил, она не знала. Она пропускала влажный хлеб через масляный муслин, тяжелый, блокадный хлеб, она варила сушеную морковь благодаря ее шурину, который получил немного в комиссариате. Вера пришла, его жена, та самая старшая сестра, которая говорила о любви. Она принесла зерно и горсть сахарного песка. Ребенок выжил, и теперь ему было два года.
Он будет жить, он будет похож на своего отца, которого она не любила.
Но она любила этого человека. Это была любовь с первого взгляда. Блокада не была снята. Но было лето, и она жила с Верой, детьми Веры и ее маленьким мальчиком примерно в 8 милях от Токсово. Она работала на ферме, и после зимы, после голода и жуткого холода, она внезапно оказалась среди солнечного света, зелени и тепла. Это было похоже на чудо.
В этой маленькой, забытой деревне снаряды, которые падали в далеком Ленинграде, были почти не слышны. Они жили в большом коттедже — две женщины и трое детей. К тому времени муж Веры также был убит. Вера сразу же постарела и не могла смотреть на сестру без враждебности.
«Это отвратительно, как солдаты всегда смотрят на тебя».
Но что могла сделать Ася, если жизнь энергично проходила по ее венам, если ее глаза были такими же синими, как небо, и она светилась счастьем жизни.
Военный патруль шел по улице мимо их коттеджа. Обычно было два солдата. Иногда они звонили и спрашивали просто в качестве предлога для посещения: «Вы заметили что-нибудь подозрительное здесь?» И они раздавали сахар детям.
«Это совершенно бесполезно!», строго сказала Вера.
Ася ничего не сказала, а затем солдаты улыбнулись, вытащили свои табачные мешки и закурили, решив, что молчание Аси означало, что она не такая, как и ее сестра.
Однажды он пришел. Высокий молодой человек, с накидкой, накинутой на плечи, и в изящно наклоненной фуражке.
Был вечер, и солнце медленно опускалось за синий силуэт леса, и над землей была мирная тишина. Дети играли на улице, и Ася сидела на скамейке у ворот с Верой. Они упорно работали весь день на прополке, и теперь они отдыхали. Он шел вместе с другим солдатом, маленьким человечком, похожим на Павла, но в тот момент она не помнила своего мужа. Она посмотрела на высокого молодого человека и их взгляды встретились. Он приветствовал ее.
«Просто криминально смотреть, как ты поступаешь», — сказала Вера. «Тебе должно быть стыдно за себя! Никто не подумает, что была блокада…»
«Есть блокада».
«Или что твой муж убит».
«Да».
Солнце опустилось ниже, и небо было розовым. Через розовое пространство пролетели черные вороны. Они взмахнули крыльями, а затем все стало тише. Патруль подошел к концу деревни и вернулся снова.
«Пойдем», — сказала Вера.
«Я посижу здесь еще немного».
Вернулся их патруль, «Добрый вечер!» — сказал высокий молодой человек снова.
Вера встала и демонстративно вошла в дом.
«Добрый вечер», ответила Ася с улыбкой.
«Ты иди», — сказал высокий парень другому.
Маленький солдат ушел.
«Можно?» — спросил высокий солдат.
«Пожалуйста, садитесь».
Он сел рядом с ней на скамейке.
Так они познакомились. Его звали Борис, Борис Маевский. Он был художником.
Она никогда не верила в любовь, считая, что она существует только в книгах и песнях. И вот она была влюблена. Он понял. Она ничего не пыталась скрыть. Она поняла, что нравится ему, она видела это в его глазах, больших, живых, радостных глазах. С ним было легко говорить. О чем бы они ни говорили, она все находила интересным. Они обсуждали искусство — она была образованной девушкой и училась на учителя. Она могла говорить о природе, которую она любила. Она любила все, что было ему дорого. Единственное, о чем они не говорили, это война и Павел. Но она рассказала ему о Павле сама. Это был день, когда она отправилась в город за продуктовыми карточками. Они встретились в пути. Армейские грузовики ехали по дороге, но военные машины не могли взять гражданских лиц, и Ася шла к станции.
«Позволь мне помочь», — сказал Борис, поднимая руку.
Грузовик остановился, и они забрались в кабину.
«Но как… тебе разрешено ехать в город?»
«Им это не очень понравится, но если я не приду, кто остановит для тебя грузовик, когда ты вернешься домой?»
Машина качалась и билась, бросая их друг к другу. Им было приятно, и каждый притворялся, что не замечает, когда их плечи соприкасались.
В поезде было приятно, что он двигался очень-очень медленно, останавливаясь, чтобы пропускать грузовые и конные поезда. В купе было мало людей, и никто не мешал им смотреть друг другу в глаза и говорить то, что приходило им в голову.
Затем они сели в трамвай и все еще продолжали говорить и смеяться, и пассажиры смотрели на них, нахмурившись и сбившись с толку, потому что Ася и Борис, казалось, пришли из какого-то совершенно другого мира, где не было войны, ни страха, ни боли, ни смерти.
Идея заключалась в том, что как только Ася получит свои продуктовые карточки и достанет продукты питания, они вернутся обратно. Но вместо этого они решили отправиться в дом Асии в городе и выпить чаю.
Там они провели ночь. Она ничего не скрывала от него, рассказывая ему все о Павле. Но Павел не бросил тень между ними. Для нее было так, как будто Павел никогда не существовал. Для Бориса он существовал, но он был просто кем-то, кого не любила Ася.
«Я люблю тебя», — сказал Борис. «Я влюбился в тебя сразу когда увидел. Я всегда буду любить тебя, где бы я ни был. И если я выживу, я вернусь, а потом мы будем вместе, всегда вместе!»
У него был мощный голос и мощные руки. Он был широкоплечий, с большой головой и сильным ртом.
В комнате было темно. Внезапно засияло солнце. Было пять утра.
«Ты как индианка. Совершенно бронзовый цвет лица», — сказал он. «Это солнце. ..»
За отсутствие без разрешения Борис был отправлен в штрафной батальон. «Как же здорово, что у меня хороший командир — меня могли бы наказать как дезертира», — писал он Асе с фронта.
Во всех своих письмах он писал, что помнит ее, тоскует по ней и любит ее. Она отвечала ему: «Я люблю тебя, я скучаю по тебе, я жду тебя!». Теперь даже Вера не упрекала ее за ее «неприличную» красоту. Ася начала терять свою красоту — она так боялась за него, и вдобавок к этому она была беременна. Она написала и сказала ему, и он был доволен этим. «Мы уже проходим через Одер, — писал он, — и вскоре мы будем в Берлине. Следи за собой! Я буду с тобой!»
Она родила дочь. Но писем больше не было. Он был убит? Был ли он в больнице? Она ничего не знала. Она просто страдала и ждала. Она ждала каждый день, каждый час, каждую минуту. Утром она уже ждала, когда она бежала с работы, она заглядывала в почтовый ящик, но он был пустой, всегда пустой. Вечером она ждала. Она будет дремать, ожидая письма. Одно и то же каждый день, каждый час, каждую минуту.
Война подошла к концу. Все, кто должен был вернуться, пришли домой. Но не Борис. Затем она начала искать его. Она разослала запросы. Возможно, он был в военном госпитале. Возможно, он лежал где-то искалеченным, боясь напомнить ей о своем существовании. Но он не был в больнице. Они проследили его до Москвы. Она была недоверчивой и решила, что это кто-то другой с тем же именем. Когда Вера отправилась в командировку в Москву, она попросила ее пойти по адресу, чтобы подтвердить, что это не ее Борис.
Вера нашла улицу, квартал, квартиру, в которой жил Борис Маевский. Она позвонила в звонок, и он сам открыл дверь. Из коридора раздался плач ребенка.
«Простите, Иванов здесь живет?» — спросила Вера.
«Нет», — ответил Борис Маевский. Он не узнал ее, но Вера узнала его.
«Простите», — сказала Вера и ушла. Это были ее инструкции от Аси, позвонить и уйти, не раскрывая ничего. «Если это действительно он, тогда ты не должна подавать никаких признаков, он не должен догадаться, что я ищу его, но, конечно, это не может быть он …»
«Почему он это сделал?», спросила Ася после возвращения Веры. «Зачем? Разве он не полюбил меня? Разве он не любил меня вообще, это было из-за ребенка? Но он был рад, когда узнал, что я родила дочь. Он написал это, но после этого письма прекратились. Но почему, о почему? Возможно, я казалась слишком поверхностной? Возможно, мне показалось, что все в порядке, пока продолжалась война, но как только война закончилась, зачем ему нужен такой человек? Конечно, он решил, что я слишком поверхностная… Вероятно, он думал, что если бы не он, это был бы кто-то еще.… Наверное, был … И тогда уже был Вовка, сын.
Ася больше не ждала, что Борис вернется как ее муж, как человек, который брал ее на руки и говорил о любви. Она стала ждать его, как отца своей дочери. Почему он не пришел? В конце концов, было не так далеко от Москвы до Ленинграда. Всего одна ночь в поезде. Почему он не пришел, чтобы взглянуть на дочь? Каждый день она была готова к такой встрече. «Предположим, он внезапно появился?» Она всегда была одета, как будто он мог появиться в любой момент. Она не хотела, чтобы мать его дочери выглядела неряшливо и неопрятно. Нет, нет, она всегда была чистой и опрятной; несмотря на то, что ее одежда была совсем не роскошной, она была аккуратной. Ей было тяжело воспитывать двух детей. Никто ей не помогал — пенсия, которую она получала за Павла, была не очень большой, и она полагалась на свои собственные силы. И у нее были основания гордиться и держать высоко голову. Она сделала все это своими силами!
Она прошла курс и работала диспетчером на заводе. Раньше она была неквалифицированным рабочим на конвейерной ленте. Она получила более высокую заработную плату, и все стало проще: у нее было больше времени для детей — она не так уставала, она проводила с ними вечера и водила их на концерты и в театры. Нет, он мог появиться в любую минуту, и ей было бы нечего стыдиться – ни за себя, ни за детей. Пусть он придет…
Ее сын отправился на службу в армию. Ее дочь поступила в колледж. Главное было достигнуто — она вырастила детей. Он все еще мог их посетить, но она знала, что не хочет его видеть. Тогда ей было 25 лет, теперь ей было почти 50 … Это было все в прошлом. Но в этом случае казалось странным, что он не пришел. Почему он просто не пришел по доброй воле? В конце концов, между ними было что-то, что никогда не могло быть забыто! В этой самой комнате он говорил ей о любви, сказал ей, что она похожа на индианку…
Комната была совершенно пустой. Все было вывезено и загружено в фургон. Теперь ей нужно было только повернуть ключ в замке и отправиться в новую квартиру, квартиру, в которой он никогда не был, и вряд ли будет…
«Мама, что ты делаешь?», перед ней стояла дочь. Сильная и высокая, очень похожая на своего отца. Она нетерпеливо смотрела на свою мать. Она была такой же, как отец, которого она никогда не видела — и что ему стоило прийти хотя бы один раз просто из любопытства посмотреть на свою дочь. Он бы увидел, как она воспитала их дочь, и у него не было бы причин стыдиться ее.
«Мама, водитель говорит, что пора ехать!»
«Хорошо, я иду …»
В последний раз она оглядела комнату: «Если он придет, а мы ушли? Возможно, я оставлю ключ в двери. Он войдет и увидит, что комната пуста, и он поймет, что мы переехали. Тогда, если он захочет, будет несложно найти нас … »
Она оставила ключ в двери.