Google+

Posthaste by Colin Howard

Posthaste by Colin Howard

Posthaste by Colin Howard


“I say, I am pleased to see you!” declared the little man standing dejectedly by the pillar-box.
“Oh, hullo!” I said, stopping. “Simpson, isn’t it?”
The Simpsons were newcomers to the neighbourhood, and my wife and I had only met them once or twice.
“Yes, that’s right!” returned Simpson. He seemed quite gratified by my ready recognition. “I wonder if you could lend me two pence-half-penny?” I plunged an investigatory hand into my pocket. “You see, my wife gave me a letter to post, and I’ve just noticed it isn’t stamped.”
“They never are,” I said, sympathetically.
“It must go to-night — it really must! And I don’t suppose I should find a post-office open at this time of night, do you?”
The hour being close upon eleven, I agreed that it seemed improbable.
“So I thought, you see, I’d get stamps out of the machine,” explained Simpson, not without pride in his ingenuity. “Only I find I haven’t any coppers on me.”
“I’m awfully sorry, but I’m afraid I haven’t either,” I told him, concluding my explorations.
“Oh, dear, dear!” he said. Just like that. He was that sort of little man.
“Perhaps somebody else —” I put forward.
“There isn’t anyone else.”

He looked up the street, and I looked down. Then he looked down the street, and I looked up. We both drew blank.
“Yes, well,” I said, and made to move off. But he looked so forlorn, standing there clutching a blue, unstamped envelope, that I really hadn’t the heart to desert him.
“Tell you what,” I said. “You’d better walk along with me to my place — it’s only a couple of streets off — and I’ll try to hunt up some change for you there.”
“It’s really awfully good of you!” said Simpson, blinking earnestly.
At home we managed to run the coveted two-pence-half- pence to earth. I handed the sum to Simpson, who, in the most businesslike way, made a note of the loan in his pocket-book, and departed. I watched him take a dozen steps up the road, hesitate, and then return to me.
“I say, I am sorry to trouble you again,” he said. “The fact is, we’re still quite strangers round here, and — well, I’m rather lost, to tell you the truth. Perhaps you’d direct me to the post-office?”
I did my best. I spent three solid minutes in explaining to him exactly where the post-office was. At the end of that time I felt as lost as Simpson.
“I’m — I’m afraid I don’t quite —” he blinked.
“Here, I’d better come along with you,” I said.
“Oh, I say, that’s awfully kind of you!” he assured me.
I felt inclined to agree with him. I led the way to the post- office. Simpson inserted a penny in the automatic stamp- machine. The coin passed through the machine with a hollow rattle. Its transit failed to produce the desired stamp. Simpson looked at me with a what-do-I-do-now sort of expression.
“It’s empty,” I explained.
“Oh!” said Simpson.
Experiment revealed that the stock of halfpenny stamps was also exhausted. Simpson, at his agitation at this discovery, dropped the letter face downwards on the pavement, whence he retrieved it with the addition of a large blob of mud.
“There!” ejaculated Simpson, quite petulantly. “Now it’s got mud on it!” He rattled the empty machines spitefully. “Well, what can we do now?”
I gathered that I was definitely a member of the posting panу.
“I suppose it must go tonight?” I said.
“Dear me, yes! My wife was most insistent about that. She said I wasn’t to — It’s — well, I don’t know that it’s extraordinarily important, but — but I’d better post it, if you know what I mean.”
I did know. Or, at least, I knew Mrs Simpson.
“I know — I’ve got a book of stamps at home!” I suddenly remembered.
“We ought to have thought of that before!” said Simpson, almost severely.
“We’d better hurry, or we shall miss the post,» I told him.
We hurried. It was as well we did hurry, because it took rather a long while to find the book of stamps. And it wasn’t really worth finding, after all. It was empty.
“How very provoking!” was Simpson’s summing-up of the matter.
“Funny!” I said. “I could have sworn it was nearly full!”
“But what about my letter?” asked Simpson, dolefully.
“You’ll have to post it unstamped, that’s all,” I said. I was beginning to lose interest in Simpson’s letter.
“Oh. could I do that?” he asked, brightening.
“What else can you do? The other chap will have to pay double postage on it in the morning, but that can’t be helped.”
“I shouldn’t like to do that.”
“Neither should I. Still, that’s his trouble. Now, hurry, or you’ll miss the last collection.”
Much flustered by this reminder, Simpson went off up the street at a trot.
“Hi! The other way!” I roared after him.
“Sorry!” he panted, returning. “I rather think I’ve forgotten the way again.”
I didn’t even start to explain. I just took him firmly by the arm and escorted him to the post-office, in time for the midnight collection. I knew it would save me time in the end. He dropped in his letter and then, to finish off my job properly, I took him home.
“I’m most awfully grateful to you, really,” he assured me, earnestly, from his doorstep. “I — I can’t think what I should have done without you. That letter — it’s only an invitation to dinner, to — good gracious!”
“Why, what’s the matter?”
“Nothing. Just something I’ve remembered.”
“What?”
But he didn’t tell me. He just goggled at me like a stricken goldfish, jerked out a “good-night,” and popped indoors.
All the way home I was wondering what it was he’d remembered.
But I stopped wondering next morning, when I had to pay the postman five pence for a blue envelope with a great muddy mark on its face.

Posthaste by Colin Howard

Поспешность (Колин Ховард)
«Я говорю, я рад тебя видеть!», сказал маленький человек, понуро стоящий возле почтового ящика.
«О, здравствуй!», сказал я, останавливаясь. «Симпсон, не так ли?»
Симпсоны были новичками в этом районе, и моя жена, и я встречали их только один или два раза.
«Да, правильно!», ответил Симпсон. Казалось, он вполне удовлетворен моим признанием. «Не могли бы вы мне одолжить два с половиной пенса?». Я опустил руку в карман. «Видите ли, моя жена дала мне письмо, которое нужно отправить, и я только что заметил, что на нем нет марки».
«Их никогда не бывает», сказал я, сочувственно.
«Я должен его отправить сегодня, это действительно необходимо! И я не думаю, что смогу найти открытое почтовое отделение в это время, не так ли?»
Время подбиралось к одиннадцати вечера, я решила, что это казалось невероятным.
«Я подумал, я могу купить марки в автомате», объяснил Симпсон, не без гордости своей изобретательностью. «Только у меня нет с собой ни пенни».
«Я очень сожалею, но боюсь, что у меня тоже нет», сказал я ему, закончив исследовать свой карман.
«О, боже-боже!», сказал он. Просто так. Вот такой он был маленький человек.
«Возможно кто-то еще», предположил я.
«Больше никого нет».
Он посмотрел вверх по улице, а я посмотрел вниз. Затем он посмотрел вниз, а я посмотрел вверх. Улица была пуста.
«Да, хорошо», сказал я, и хотел уйти. Но он выглядел таким несчастным, стоя там и сжимая синий конверт без марок, что у меня просто не хватило духу покинуть его.
«Знаете что», сказал я. «Вам лучше пойти ко мне домой, это всего лишь несколько улиц отсюда. И я попытаюсь найти что-нибудь для вас там».
«Это действительно ужасно мило с вашей стороны!», сказал Симпсон, искренне мигая.
Дома нам удалось найти желанные два с половиной пенса. Я протянул эту сумму Симпсону, который деловито сделал заметку в карманной книге и удалился. Я наблюдал, как он сделал десяток шагов вверх по дороге, заколебался, а затем вернулся ко мне.
«Извиняюсь, что беспокою вас снова», сказал он. «Дело в том, что мы все еще новички здесь, и — ну, я растерялся, чтобы сказать вам правду. Может быть, вы скажите, как добраться до почтового отделения?»
Я сделал все возможное. Я потратил целых три минуты, объясняя ему, где именно находится почтовое отделение. В конце концов, я чувствовал себя таким же потерянным как Симпсон.
«Я — боюсь, я не совсем», заморгал он.
«Так, я лучше пойду с вами», сказал я.
«О, это ужасно мило с вашей стороны!», заверил он меня.
Я был склонен согласиться с ним. Я довел его до почтового отделения. Симпсон вставил пенни в автомат с марками. Монета прошла через машину с дребезгом. Ее путь был не в состоянии произвести желаемую марку. Симпсон посмотрел на меня с выражением «что-мне-теперь-делать» на лице.
«Он пуст», объяснил я.
«О!», Сказал Симпсон.
Эксперимент показал, что запас марок за половину пенни тоже исчерпан. Симпсон, разочарованный этим открытием, бросил письмо на тротуар, откуда он поднял его с большим куском грязи.
«Вот!», воскликнул Симпсон, довольно капризно. «Теперь на нем грязь!», он злобно потряс пустые автоматы. «Ну и что мы можем сейчас сделать?»
Я понял, что я определенно был членом почтовой паники.
«Я полагаю, оно должно быть отправлено сегодня вечером?», сказал я.
«Боже мой, да! Моя жена очень на этом настаивала. Она сказала, что я должен, ну, я не знаю настолько ли это важно, но мне бы лучше отправить его, если вы понимаете, что я имею в виду».
Я не знал. Или, по крайней мере, я знал миссис Симпсон.
«Я знаю, у меня есть книга с марками дома!», вдруг вспомнил я.
«Мы должны были подумать об этом раньше!», сказал Симпсон, почти строго.
«Нам лучше поспешить, или мы опоздаем на почту», сказал я ему.
Мы спешили. По крайней мере, это так выглядело, потому что это заняло довольно много времени, чтобы найти книгу с марками. И на самом деле, не стоило ее находить, в конце концов. Она была пуста.
«Как досадно!», подвел итоги Симпсон.
«Забавно!», сказал я. «Я мог бы поклясться, что он был почти полный!»
«А как насчет моего письма?», спросил Симпсон, скорбно.
«Вам придется отправить его без марок, вот и все», сказал я. Я начал терять интерес к письму Симпсона.
«Ой. Могу ли я сделать это?», спросил он, сияя.
«А что еще можно сделать? Получателю придется оплатить двойной тариф за его доставку утром».
«Я бы не хотел этого делать».
«Я тоже. Тем не менее, это его проблема. Теперь спешите, или вы пропустите последний забор писем».
Сильно взволнованный этим напоминанием, Симпсон рысцой побежал вверх по улице.
«Эй! В другую сторону!», прокричал я ему вслед.
«Извините!», вернулся он задыхаясь. «Я думаю, что снова забыл дорогу».
Я даже не начинал объяснять. Я просто крепко взял его за руку и повел на почту, ко времени полуночного забора писем. Я знал, что это позволит сэкономить мне время, в конце концов. Он отправил письмо, а затем, чтобы закончить свою работу должным образом, я отвел его домой.
«Я ужасно благодарен вам, на самом деле», заверил он меня искренне у своего порога. «Я, я даже не знаю, чтобы я без вас делал. Это письмо — это только приглашение на обед, так что помилуйте».
«Почему? В чем дело?»
«Ничего. Я просто кое-что вспомнил».
«Что?»
Но он не сказал мне. Он просто таращился на меня как вытащенная из воды золотая рыбка, пробормотал «Доброй ночи» и заскочил внутрь.
Всю дорогу домой я задавался вопросом, что это он вспомнил.
Но я перестал удивляться следующим утром, когда мне пришлось заплатить почтальону пять пенсов за синий конверт с грязной отметкой.