Google+

Screaming woman by Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury

My name is Margaret Leary and I’m twelve years old. I haven’t any brothers or sisters, but I’ve got a nice father and mother except that they don’t pay much attention to me. And anyway, we never thought we’d have anything to do with a murdered woman.
I’ll tell you how it happened. It was in the middle of July. It was hot and Mother said to me, “Margaret, go to the shop and buy some ice cream. It’s Saturday, Dad’s home for lunch, so we’ll have a treat.”
I ran out across the bombed site behind our house. It was a big piece of ground where the kids played and there was broken glass and stuff.
On my way back from the shop with the ice cream I was just walking along, minding my own business, when all of a sudden it happened. I heard the Screaming Woman.
I stopped and listened. It was coming up from out of the ground. A woman was buried under the rocks and dirt and glass, and was screaming for someone to dig her out.
I just stood there, afraid, and she kept screaming. Then I started to run. I fell down, got up again and ran some more.

I opened the door of our house and there was Mother, calm as usual.
«‘Don’t just stand there with the ice cream melting,” said Mother.
“But, Mum — ” I said.
“Put it in the fridge,” she said.
“Listen, Mum, there’s a Screaming Woman…”
“And wash your hands,” said Mother.
“She was screaming and screaming…”
“Let’s see now, salt and pepper,” said Mother, far away.
“Listen to me,” I said, loudly. “We’ve got to dig her out. If we don’t dig her out, she’ll choke and die.”
«I’m certain she can wait until after lunch,” said Mother.
«Mum, don’t you believe me?’
“Of course, dear. Now take the plates…”
I went into the dining room.
Dad, there’s a Screaming Woman in the bombed site.”
“I never knew a woman who didn’t” he said.
“I’m serious,” I told him. “We must get spades and dig her out.
“I don’t feel like an archaeologist today, Margaret,” said Father. “It’s too hot. How about some nice cool October day?”
“But we can’t wait that long” I almost screamed. I was excited and scared and here was Dad, putting meat on his plate and paying me no attention.
“Dad?” I said,
“Mm?”
“Dad, you’ve just got to come out after lunch and help me,” I said. “Dad, Dad, I’ll give you all the money in my piggybank!”
He touched my arm.
“I’m moved. I’m really moved. You want me to play with you and you’re willing to pay for my time. Honestly, Margaret, you make your old Dad fell a real meanie. I don’t give you enough time. Tell you what, after lunch I’ll come out and listen to your screaming woman, free of charge.”
“Will you, oh, will you, really?”
“Yes,” said Dad. “But you must promise me one thing.”
“What?”
“If I come out, you must eat all of your lunch first.”
“I promise,” I said.
Mother came in and sat down and we started to eat.
“Not so fast,” she said.
I slowed down. Then I started eating fast again.
“You heard your mother,” said Dad.
“The Screaming Woman,” I said. “We must hurry.”
Lunch was a million years long. Everybody moved in slow motion, like those films you see sometimes. Mother got up slowly and sat down slowly, and forks and knives and spoons moved slowly. Even the flies in the room were slow. It was all so slow I wanted to scream. “Hurry! Oh, please, get up, come on out, run!”
“There we are,” said Dad, finished at last.
“Now will you come out to see the Screaming Woman?” I said.
“First a little more cold beer,” said Dad.
“Speaking of screaming women,” said Mother, “Charlie Nesbitt and his wife were fighting again last night.”
“That’s nothing new,” said Father. “They’re always fighting.
“If you ask me, Charlie’s no good,” said Mother, “or her, either.
“Oh, I don’t know,” said Dad. “I think she’s quite nice.”
“You’re prejudiced. After all, you nearly married her.”
“Are you going to bring that up again?” he asked. “After all, I was only engaged to her or six weeks. But she was sweet. Sweet and kind.”
What did it get her? A terrible brute of a husband like Charlie.”
“Dad,” I said.
“Charlie has got a terrible temper,” said Dad. “Remember when Helen had the lead in our school play? Pretty as a picture. She wrote some songs for it herself. That was the time she wrote that song for me.”
“Ha,” said Mother.
“Don’t laugh. It was a good song.”
«You never told me about that song.”
“It was between Helen and me. Let’s see, how did it go.”
“Dad,” I said.
“You’d better take your daughter out to the bombed site,” said Mother, “before she faints. You can sing me that wonderful song later.”
“OK, come on,” said Dad, and I ran him out of the house. The bombed site was still empty and hot and the glass sparkled green and white and brown all around the place,
“Now, where s this Screaming Woman?” laughed Dad.
“We forget the spades,” I cried.
“We’ll get them later, alter we hear the soloist,” said Dad. “Listen,” I said. We listened.
“I don’t hear anything,” said Dad at last.
“Shh,” I said. “Wait.”
We listened some more. We heard the wind in the trees. We heard a train, far away. We heard a car pass. That was all. Margaret,” said Father, “you’d better go and lie down and put a damp cloth on your forehead.”
“But she was here,” I shouted, «I heard her. Look, here’s where the ground’s been dug up.”
“Margaret,” said Father, “this is the place where Mr Kelly dug a big hole yesterday, to bury his rubbish in.”
“But during the night,” I said, “someone else used Mr Kelly’s burying place to bury a woman.”
“Well, I’m going back home,” said Dad. “Better not stay out here too long. It’s hot.” And he walked off. The screaming started again. I stood on the bombed site in the hot sun and I felt like crying. I ran back to the house.
“Dad, she’s screaming again!”
Yes, yes, of course she is,” said Dad. And he led me upstairs to my bedroom. He made me lie down and put a cold cloth on my head. “Just take it easy.” I began to cry. “Oh, Dad, we can’t let her die.
“I forbid you to leave this house, said Dad, worried. «You just lie there for the rest of the afternoon.” He went out and locked the door. I heard him and Mother talking, and after a while I stopped crying.
I got up, took a sheet off the bed, tied it to the bedpost and let it out of the window’. Then I got out о the window and climbed down until I touched the ground. I ran to the shed, got a couple of spades and ran to the bombed site.
It was hard work. But what could I do? Run and tell other people? But they’d be like Mum and Dad, pay no attention. So I kept digging.
About ten minutes later Dippy Smith came across the bombed site. He’s my age and goes to my school.
“Hullo, Margaret,” he said.
“Hullo, Dippy,» I answered.
“What’re you doing?” he asked.
“Digging.»
“What for?”
“I’ve got a Screaming lady in the ground and I’m digging for her.”
“I don t hear any screaming,” said Dippy.
“You sit down and wait a while. Or better help me dig.”
“I don’t dig until I hear a scream,” he said.
He waited. “Listen,” I cried. “Did you hear it?”
“Golly,” said Dippy, his eyes gleaming. Do it again!”
“Do what again?”
“The scream.”
“We’ve got to wait,” I said, puzzled.
“Do it again,” he insisted, shaking my arm.
A scream came out of the ground.
“Please, Margaret, teach me to do it!” He danced around me as if I was a miracle.
“If you help me, I lied.
We both dug together, and from time to time the woman screamed.
“Gee,” said Dippy. «You’re wonderful, Maggie.”
We kept digging and I thought, oh, we’ll rescue her, we will.
“Oh,” said Dippy about ten minutes later. “I’m tired, I think I’ll go home and have a rest.”
“You can’t do that.”
“Who says so?”
“Dippy, there’s something I want to tell you. There’s really a woman buried here.”
“Why, of course there is,” he said. “You told me, Maggie.”
“You don’t believe me either.”
“Teach me to scream and I’ll keep on digging.”
“Look, Dippy, I’ll stand over there and you listen here.”
The Screaming Woman screamed again.
“NO!» said Dippy. “But there really is a woman!”
“That’s what I tried to say.”
“Let s dig!” said Dippy. We dug for twenty minutes.
“I wonder who she is?”
“I don’t know.”
I wonder if it’s Mrs Nelson or Mrs Turner or Mrs Bradley. I wonder if she’s pretty. Wonder what colour her hair is. Wonder if she’s thirty or ninety, or sixty…”
“Dig!” I said.
“Wonder if she’ll reward us for digging her up.”
«Expect so.»
“A shilling, do you think:
“More than that. Perhaps ten.”
Just then a shadow fell across us.
“Now, you kids, what’d you think you’re doing?”
We turned. It was Mr Kelly, the man who owned the bombed site. “Oh, hullo, Mr Kelly,” we said.
“Tell you what I want you to do,” said Mr Kelly. “I want you to take those spades and take that soil and put it all back in that hole you’ve been digging. That’s what I want you to do.”
My heart started beating fast again, I wanted to scream myself.
“But Mr Kelly, there’s a Screaming Woman and …” “I’m not interested. I can’t hear a thing.”
“Listen!” I cried. The scream.
Mr Kelly listened and shook his head. “Can’t hear anything. Go on now, fill it up before I give you something to remember!
We filled the hole all back in again. And all the time we filled it in, Mr Kelly stood there, arms folded, and the woman screamed but Mr Kelly pretended not to hear it.
When we were finished, Mr Kelly walked off and said, “Go on home now. And if I catch you here again …”
I turned to Dippy. “He’s the one,” I whispered.
“What?” said Dippy.
“He murdered Mrs Kelly. He buried her here after he strangled her, but she came to. Why, he stood right here and she screamed arid he wouldn’t pay any attention.”
“Yes,” said Dippy, “that’s right. He stood right here and lied to us.”
“There’s only one thing to do,” I said. “Call the police and make them come and arrest Mr Kelly.”
We ran for the corner telephone box.
The police knocked on Mr Kelly’s door five minutes later. Dippy and I were hiding in the bushes listening.
“Mr Kelly?” said the police officer.
“Yes, sir, what can I do for you?”
“Is Mrs Kelly at home?”
“Yes, sir.”
“May we see her, sir?”
“Of course. Hey, Anna!”
Mrs Kelly came to the door. “Yes, sir?”
“I beg your pardon,” apologized the officer. “We had a report that you were buried out in the bombed site, Mrs Kelly. It sounded like a child making the call, but we had to be certain. Sorry to have troubled you.”
“It’s those blasted kids,” cried Mr Kelly angrily. “If I ever catch them, I’ll rip them limb from limb!”
“Scoot!” said Dippy, and we both ran.
“What’ll we do now?” I said.
“I’ve got to go home,” said Dippy. “Gosh, we’re really in trouble.”
“But what about the Screaming Woman?”
“Forget about her,” said Dippy. “We can’t dare go near that place again. Old man Kelly will be waiting around with his strap. And I just happened to remember, Maggie, isn’t old man Kelly sort of deaf?”
“Oh, my gosh,” I said. “No wonder he didn’t hear the screams.”
“So long,” said Dippy. “We’ve certainly got into trouble over your darned old ventriloquist voice.”
I was left all alone in the world, no one to help me, no one to believe me at all. The police were after me now, and my father was probably looking for me too.
There was only one last thing to do and I did it.
I went from house to house, all down the road. And I rang every bell and when the door opened I said:
“Excuse me, Mrs Griswood, but is anyone missing from your house?” or “Hullo, Mrs Piles, you’re looking fine today. Glad to see you home.” And when I saw that the lady of the house was home I just chatted for a while, to be polite, and went on down the road.
The hours were rolling along. I rang bells and knocked on doors, and it got late, and I was just about to give up and go home, when I knocked on the last door, which was the door of Mr Charles Nesbitt, who lives next to us. I kept knocking and knocking.
Instead of Mrs Nesbitt, or Helen, as my father calls her, coming to the door, it was Mr Nesbitt, Charlie himself.
“Oh,” he said. It’s you, Margaret.”
“Yes,” I said, “good afternoon.”
“What can I do for you?”
“Well, I thought I’d like to see your wife, Mrs Nesbitt,” I said.
“Oh,” he said.
“May I?”
“Well, she’s gone out to the shops,” he said.
“I’ll wait,” I said, and slipped in past him.
I sat down in a chair. “Goodness, it’s a hot day,” I said, trying to be calm, thinking about the bombed site and the screams getting weaker and weaker.
“Listen,” said Charlie, coming over to me. “I don’t think you’d better wait.”
“But Mr Nesbitt,” I said, “why not?”
“Well, my wife won’t be back”, he said.
“Oh?”
“Not today, that is. She’s gone to the shops, as I said, but — but she’s going on from there to visit her mother. That’s right. She’s going to see her mother in Bristol. She’ll be back in two or three days, perhaps a week.”
“I wanted to tell her something,” I said.
“What?”
“I just wanted to tell her there’s a woman buried in the bombed site, screaming under tons and tons of dirt.”
Mr Nesbitt dropped his cigarette.
“You’ve dropped your cigarette, Mr Nesbitt.”
“Have I? Oh, yes. So I have,” he mumbled. “Well, I’ll tell Helen your story when she comes back home. She’ll be glad to hear it.”
«Thanks. It’s a real woman.”
“How do you know?”
“I heard her.”
“Margaret, did you — er — say anything about this to anyone?”
“Yes. I told lots of people.”
“Anybody doing anything about it?” he asked.
«No,” I said. “They won’t believe me.”
He smiled. “Of course not. Naturally. You’re only a kid.”
“I’m going back now to dig her out with a spade,” I said.
“Wait.”
“I must go now,” I said.
“Stay with me a bit,” he insisted.
“Thanks, but no.” I said frantically.
He took my arm. “Know how to play cards?”
“Yes.”
He took out a pack of cards from a desk.
“We’ll have a game.”
“I’ve got to go and dig.”
Plenty of time for that,” he said quietly. “Anyway, perhaps my wife will come home. That’s it. You wait for her. Wait for a while.”
“You think she will?”
“Of course. Er — about that voice — is it very strong?”
“It gets weaker all the time.”
Mr Nesbitt sighed and smiled. «You and your childish games. Here now, let s play — it’s more fun than screaming women.”
I knew what he was trying to do. He was trying to keep me in his house until the screaming had died down. He was trying to keep me from helping her. “My wife’ll be home in ten minutes,” he said. “That’s right. Ten minutes. You wait.”
We played cards. The clock ticked. The sun went down the sky. It was getting late. The screaming got fainter and fainter in my mind. I’ve got to go,” I said.
“Another game,» said Mr Nesbitt. “Wait another horn. My wife won’t be long. Just wait.”
In another hour he looked at his watch. “Well, I think you can go now.” And I knew what his plan was. He’d sneak down in the middle of the night and dig up his wife, still alive, and take her somewhere else and bury her, properly.
“Good-bye, Margaret. So long.”
I went back near the bombed site and hid in some bushes. What could I do? Tell my father and mother? But they hadn’t believed me. Call the police? But Charlie Nesbitt would say his wife was away. Nobody would believe me!
I watched Mr Kelly’s house. He wasn’t in sight. I ran over to the place where the screaming had been and just stood there. The screaming had stopped. It was so quiet I thought I would never hear a scream again. It was all over. I was too late, I thought. I bent down and put my ear against the ground.
And then I heard it, so faint I could hardly hear it. The woman wasn’t screaming any more. She was singing. Something about, I loved you fair, I loved you well. It was a sad song. Very faint All of those hours down under the ground must have made her crazy. She just kept singing, not wanting to scream any more.
I listened to the song. And then I turned and walked straight across the bombed site and up the steps of our house.
“Father,” I said.
“So there you are!” he cried.
“Father,” I said. “She’s not screaming anymore.”
«Don’t talk about her!”
“She is singing now,” I cried.
“You’re not telling the truth!”
“Dad,” I said, she’s out there and she’ll be dead soon if you don’t listen to me. She’s out there, singing, and that’s what she’s singing.” I sang a few of the words — I loved you fair, I loved you well.
“Where did you hear that song?” he shouted.
“Out in the bombed site, just now.”
“But that’s Helen’s song, the one she wrote years ago for me! You can’t know it. Nobody knew it except Helen and me. I never sang it to anyone.”
“That’s right,” I said.
“Oh, my God!” cried Father, and ran out of the house.
The last I saw of him he was on the bombed site, digging, and lots of other people with him, digging. I felt so happy I wanted to cry.
I dialled a number on the phone and when Dippy answered I said, «Hullo, Dippy. Everything’s fine. Everything’s all right. The Screaming Woman isn’t screaming any more.”
“Great,” said Dippy.
“I’ll meet you on the bombed site with a spade in two minutes.”
“So long,” cried Dippy.
“So long, Dippy!” I said and ran.
screaming woman
Кричащая женщина (Рей Брэдбери)
Меня зовут Маргарет Лири и мне двенадцать лет. У меня нет ни братьев, ни сестер, но у меня хорошие мама и папа, не смотря на то, что они не обращают много внимания на меня. И в любом случае, мы никогда не думали, что нам придется иметь дело с убитой женщиной.
Я расскажу вам, как это произошло. Это было в середине июля. Было жарко, и мать сказала мне, «Маргарет, сходи в магазин и купи мороженое. Сегодня суббота, папа обедает дома, так что мы полакомимся».
Я пробежала через минное поле позади нашего дома. Это большой клочок земли, где играли дети, и там было битое стекло и прочее.
На обратном пути из магазина с мороженым, я просто шла вперед, думая о своем, когда все это вдруг произошло. Я услышала Кричащую Женщину. Я остановилась и прислушалась. Звук раздавался из-под земли. Женщина была похоронена под кучей грязи и стекла, и кричала, чтобы ее выкопали.
Я просто стояла там, испуганная, а она продолжала кричать. Я побежала. Я упала, снова встала и пробежала еще немного. Я открыла дверь нашего дома, и там была мама, спокойная, как обычно.
«Не стой там, мороженное растает», сказала мама.
«Но, мама», сказал я.
«Положи его в холодильник…», сказала она.
«Послушай мам, там Кричащая Женщина…»
«И вымой руки», сказала мама.
«Она кричала и кричала …»
«Давайте посмотрим сейчас, соль и перец», сказала мама, вдалеке.
«Послушайте меня», сказал я, громко. «Мы должны выкопать ее. Если мы не выкопаем ее, она задохнется и умрет».
«Я уверена, что она может подождать, пока мы пообедаем», сказала мама.
«Мама, ты не веришь мне?»
«Конечно, дорогая. Теперь возьми тарелки …»
Я пошла в столовую.
«Папа, там Кричащая Женщина на минном поле».
«Я никогда не знал женщину, которая бы не кричала», сказал он.
«Я серьезно», сказал я ему. «Мы должны взять лопаты и выкопать ее».
«Я не чувствую себя сегодня археологом, Маргарет», сказал отец. «Слишком жарко. Как насчет приятного прохладного октябрьского дня?»
«Но мы не можем ждать так долго», почти прокричала я. Я была взволнована и напугана, а папа накладывал мясо на тарелку и не обращал никакого внимания.
«Папа», сказала я.
«Мм?»
«Папа, просто встань из-за стола и помоги мне», сказала я. «Папа, папа, я отдам тебе все деньги из копилки!»
«Я тронут. Я действительно тронут. Ты хочешь, чтобы я поиграл с тобой, и ты готова заплатить за мое время. Честно говоря, Маргарет, ты выставляешь своего старого папу скупердяем. Я не уделяю тебе достаточно времени. Знаешь что, после обеда я выйду и послушаю твою кричащую женщину бесплатно».
«Ты действительно выйдешь? Правда?»
«Да», сказал папа. «Но ты должна мне кое-что пообещать».
«Что?»
«Если я выйду, то ты должна сперва съесть свой обед».
«Я обещаю», сказала я.
Мама пришла и села за стол, и мы начали есть.
«Не так быстро», сказала она.
Я замедлилась, но затем начала снова быстро есть.
«Ты слышала маму», сказал папа.
«Кричащая женщина», сказал я. «Мы должны спешить».
Обед длился миллион лет. Все двигались словно в замедленной съемке, как в некоторых фильмах. Мама медленно поднялась, медленно села, ножи, вилки и ложки двигались медленно. Даже мухи в комнате были медленными. Все это было так медленно, что я хотела закричать. «Спешите! О, пожалуйста, вставайте, бегите!»
«Вот и все», сказал отец, наконец-то закончив обедать.
«Теперь давай выйдем и посмотрим на Кричащую Женщину?», сказала я.
«Сначала еще немножко холодного пива», сказал папа.
«Кстати о кричащих женщинах», сказала мама, «Чарли Несбитт и его жена снова ссорились вчера вечером».
«В этом нет ничего нового», сказал отец. «Они всегда ссорятся».
«Если вы спросите меня, Чарли не очень хороший», сказала мама. «Да и она тоже».
«Ну, я не знаю», сказал папа. «Я думаю, что она очень приятная».
«Ты преувеличиваешь. В конце концов, ты почти женился на ней».
«Ты снова об этом?», спросил он. «В конце концов, я был с ней где-то шесть недель. Но она была милой. Милой и доброй».
«И что же ее изменило? Ужасно грубый муж, такой как Чарли».
«Папа», сказала я.
«У Чарли ужасный характер», сказал папа. «Помнишь, когда Хелен была ведущей в школьной пьесе? Красивая, как картинка. Она сама написала для нее несколько песен. Было время, когда она написала песню для меня».
«Ха», сказала мама.
«Не смейся. Это была хорошая песня».
«Ты никогда не говорил мне про эту песню».
«Это было между мной и Хелен. Но все это прошло».
«Папа», сказала я.
«Ты бы лучше вышел со своей дочерью на минное поле», сказала мама, «прежде чем она упадет в обморок. Ты сможешь спеть мне эту замечательную песню позже».
«Хорошо, пойдем», сказал отец, и я вывела его из дома. Минное поле было все еще пустым и жарким, и зеленые, белые и коричневые стекла сверкали повсюду.
«Ну, и где кричащая женщина?», засмеялся папа.
«Мы забыли лопаты», закричала я.
«Мы возьмем их позже, после того как услышим солистку», сказал папа.
«Слушай», сказала я. Мы прислушались.
«Я ничего не слышу», наконец произнес отец.
«Тсс», сказала я. «Подожди».
Мы снова прислушались. Мы слышали ветер в деревьях. Мы услышали поезд вдалеке. Мы услышали проезжающую машину. Вот и все.
«Маргарет», сказал отец. «Тебе лучше пойти лечь и положить влажное полотенце не лоб».
«Но она была здесь», закричала я. «Я слышала ее. Посмотри, вот где вскопанная земля».
«Маргарет», сказал отец, «Это то место, где мистер Келли вырыл вчера большую яму, чтобы закопать мусор».
«Но ночью», — сказала я — «кто-то еще использовал его яму, чтобы зарыть женщину».
«Ну, я возвращаюсь домой», сказал папа. «Лучше не остаться здесь слишком долго. Жарко». И он ушел. Крики раздались снова. Я стояла на минном поле, на палящем солнце, готовая расплакаться. Я побежала обратно в дом.
«Папа, она снова кричала!»
«Да, да, конечно, она кричала», сказал папа. И он повел меня наверх в мою спальню. Он заставил меня лечь и положил прохладное полотенце мне на голову. «Просто успокойся». Я начала плакать. «О, папа, мы не можем позволить ей умереть».
«Я запрещаю тебе покидать дом», сказал папа взволнованно. «Просто лежи весь оставшийся день». Он вышел и запер дверь. Я слышала его разговор с мамой, и через некоторое время перестала плакать.
Я встала, взяла простыню с кровати, привязала ее к спинке кровати и спустила вниз из окна. Затем я вылезла в окно и спустилась на землю. Я побежала в сарай, взяла пару лопат и побежала к минному полю. Это была тяжелая работа. Но что я могла сделать? Побежать и рассказать другим людям? Но они бы как мама и папа не обратили бы на это внимания. И я продолжала копать.
Минут через десять Диппи Смит оказался на минном поле. Он моего возраста и ходит в мою школу.
«Привет, Маргарет», сказал он.
«Привет, Диппи», ответила я.
«Что ты делаешь?», спросил он.
«Копаю».
«Зачем?»
«У меня Кричащая леди в земле и я копаю из-за нее».
«Я не слышу никаких криков», сказал Диппи.
«Ты сядь и подожди немного. Или лучше помоги мне копать».
«Я не буду копать, пока не услышу крик», сказал он.
Он ждал. «Слышишь?», закричала я. «Ты это слышал?»
«Черт возьми», сказал Диппи, его глаза блестели. «Сделай это снова!»
«Что сделать снова?»
«Крик».
«Нам нужно подождать», сказала я озадаченно.
«Сделай это снова», настаивал он, сжимая мне руку.
Крик раздался из-под земли.
«Пожалуйста, Маргарет, научи меня делать это!», он приплясывал вокруг меня, словно я была чудом.
«Если ты поможешь мне», солгала я.
Мы копали вместе, и время от времени женщина кричала.
«Ну и дела», сказал Диппи. «Ты прекрасна, Мэгги».
Мы продолжали копать, и я думала, что мы спасем ее, мы сделаем это.
«О», сказал Диппи минут через десять. «Я устал, я думаю, я пойду домой и отдохнуть».
«Ты не можешь этого сделать».
«Кто это сказал?»
«Диппи, я хочу тебе что-то рассказать. Там действительно похоронена женщина».
«Ну конечно есть», сказал он, «Ты же говорила мне об этом, Мэгги».
«Ты тоже мне не веришь».
«Научи меня кричать, и я буду продолжать копать».
«Смотри, Диппи, я буду стоять здесь, а ты послушай там».
Кричащая Женщина закричала снова.
«Нет!», сказал Диппи. «Там действительно женщина!»
«Это то, что я пытался сказать».
«Давай копать», сказал Диппи.
Мы копали в течение двадцати минут.
«Интересно, кто она?»
«Я не знаю».
«Интересно, это миссис Нельсон или миссис Тернер или миссис Брэдли. Интересно, какой у нее цвет волос. Интересно, ей тридцать, девяносто, или шестьдесят …»
«Копай!», сказала я.
«Интересно, она наградит нас за то, что мы ее выкопали».
«Думаю да».
«Как ты думаешь, она даст шиллинг?»
«Более того. Возможно, десять».
Именно тогда тень легла между нами.
«Дети, что вы делаете?»
Мы повернулись. Это был мистер Келли, человек, который владел минным полем. «О, здравствуйте, мистер Келли», сказали мы.
«Я скажу, что я хочу, чтобы вы сделали», сказал мистер Келли. «Я хочу, чтобы взяли лопаты и зарыли яму, которую вы выкопали. Вот что я хочу от вас».
Мое сердце снова начало быстро биться, я сама хотела закричать.
«Но мистер Келли, так Кричащая Женщина, и…»
«Мне это не интересно. Я ничего не слышу».
«Послушайте!», закричала я. Крик.
Мистер Келли послушал и покачал головой. «Я ничего не слышу. А теперь, закапывайте яму!»
Мы закопали яму. И все время пока мы ее закапывали, мистер Келли стоял там, сложив руки на груди, и женщина закричала, но он сделал вид, что ничего не слышит.
Когда мы закончили, мистер Келли ушел и сказал: «А сейчас идите домой. И если я снова вас здесь поймаю…»
Я повернулась к Диппи. «Это он», прошептала я.
«Что?», спросил Диппи.
«Он убил миссис Келли. Он похоронил ее здесь после того как задушил, но она пришла в себя. Иначе как объяснить, что он стоял прямо здесь, она кричала, а он не обращал никакого внимания».
«Да», сказал Диппи. «Это верно. Он стоял прямо здесь и лгал нам».
«Мы можем сделать только одно», сказала я. «Позвонить в полицию, заставить их приехать и арестовать мистера Келли».
Мы побежали к телефонной будке, которая находилась на углу.
Пять минут спустя полиция постучалась в дверь мистера Келли. Диппи и я спрятались в кустах и подслушивали.
«Мистер Келли?», сказал офицер полиции.
«Да, сэр, что я могу сделать для вас?»
«Миссис Келли дома?»
«Да, сэр».
«Могу ли я увидеть ее, сэр?»
«Конечно. Эй, Анна!»
Миссис Келли подошла к двери.
«Да, сэр?»
«Я прошу прощения», извинился офицер. «Мы получили сообщение, что вы были похоронены на минном поле, миссис Келли. Было похоже, что звонит ребенок, но мы должны были проверить. Извините, что побеспокоили вас».
«Это те проклятые дети», сердито воскликнул мистер Келли. «Если я только поймаю их, то порву на куски».
«Атас», закричал Диппи и мы побежали.
«Что мы будем делать теперь?», спросила я.
«Я должен вернуться домой», сказал Диппи. «Черт возьми, мы действительно в беде».
«А как же кричащая женщина?»
«Забудь о ней», сказал Диппи. «Мы не можем снова появиться в том месте. Старик Келли будет ждать там с ремнем. И я только что вспомнил, Мэгги, не глух ли старик Келли?»
«О, боже. Неудивительно, что он не слышал криков».
«Пока», сказал Dippy. «Мы, конечно, попали в беду из-за твоего старческого голоса чревовещателя».
Я осталась совсем одна в этом мире, никто не поможет мне, никто мне не верит. Сейчас полиция ищет меня, и мой отец, вероятно, тоже. Можно было сделать только одно, и я это сделала. Я ходила от дома к дому и звонила в каждую дверь, и когда мне открывали, я говорила: «Простите, миссис Грисвуд, кто-то отсутствует у вас дома?» или «Здравствуйте, Миссис Пилс, вы сегодня прекрасно выглядите. Рада видеть вас дома». И когда я видела, что хозяйка была дома, я просто немного болтала из вежливости и шла дальше по улице.
Часы пролетали. Я звонила и стучала в двери, но становилось поздно, и я уже собиралась сдаться и пойти домой, когда я постучала в последнюю дверь, это был дом мистера Чарльза Несбитта, который живет рядом с нами. Я стучала и стучала.
Вместо миссис Несбитт, или Хелен, как называет ее мой папа, дверь открыл сам мистер Несбитт.
«О», сказал он. «Это ты Маргарет?»
«Да. Добрый день».
«Чем я могу помочь?»
«Я бы хотела увидеть вашу жену, миссис Несбитт», сказала я.
«О», ответил он.
«Могу я ее увидеть?»
«Ну, она пошла по магазинам», сказал он.
«Я подожду», ответила я и проскользнула в дом. Я села в кресло.
«Боже мой, какой жаркий день», сказала я, стараясь быть спокойной. Я думала о минном поле и о криках, которые становились все слабее и слабее.
«Послушай», сказал Чарли, подходя ко мне. «Я не думаю, что тебе стоит ждать».
«Но, мистер Несбитт, почему я не могу ее подождать?»
«Ну, моя жена не вернется», сказал он.
«Да?»
«То есть не сегодня. Она пошла по магазинам, как я уже сказал, но потом сразу поедет навестить свою мать. Именно так. Она собирается встретиться со своей матерью в Бристоле. Она вернется через два-три дня, а может через неделю».
«Я хотела ей что-то сказать».
«Что?»
«Я просто хотела рассказать ей, что на минном поле похоронена женщина, и она кричит под тоннами грязи».
Мистер Несбитт уронил сигарету.
«Вы уронили сигарету, мистер Несбитт».
«Я? О, да. Я уронил», пробормотал он. «Хорошо, я расскажу Хелен твою историю, когда она вернется домой. Она будет рада ее услышать».
«Спасибо. Это настоящая женщина».
«Откуда ты знаешь?»
«Я слышала ее».
«Маргарет, а ты – э – говорила об этом еще кому-нибудь?»
«Да, я рассказала многим людям».
«Кто-нибудь что-нибудь предпринял?»
«Нет», сказала я. «Они не хотят мне верить».
Он улыбнулся. «Конечно, нет. Естественно. Ты ведь только ребенок».
«Я сейчас пойду обратно с лопатой, чтобы выкопать ее».
«Подожди».
«Я должна идти», сказала я.
«Побудь немного со мной», настаивал он.
«Спасибо, но нет», лихорадочно сказал я.
Он взял меня за руку. «Ты умеешь играть в карты?»
«Да».
Он взял колоду карт со стола.
«Мы сыграем с тобой».
«Я должна идти и копать».
«Для этого еще куча времени», сказал он тихо. «Может быть моя жена вернется домой. Подожди ее. Подожди немного».
«Думаете, она вернется?»
«Конечно. Э – о том голосе, он очень сильный?»
«Он становится слабее все время».
Мистер Несбитт вздохнул и улыбнулся. «Вы и ваши детские игры. Давай сыграем в карты, это лучше, чем кричащая женщина».
Я знала что он пытается сделать. Он пытался задержать меня в своем дом, пока крик не утихнет. Он пытался удержать меня, чтобы я не помогла ей.
«Моя жена придет домой через 10 минут», сказал он. «Это точно. Десять минут. Ты подожди».
Мы играли в карты. Тикали часы. Солнце уже зашло. Было уже поздно. На мой взгляд крики становились все слабее и слабее.
«Я должна идти», сказала я.
«Еще одна игра», сказал мистер Несбитт. «Подожди еще немного. Просто подожди».
Через час он посмотрел на часы. «Ну, я думаю, что ты можешь идти».
Я знала его план. Среди ночи он прокрадется и выкопает свою все еще живую жену и похоронит ее где-нибудь еще, понадежнее.
«Прощай, Маргарет. Пока».
Я пошла к минному полю и спряталась в кустах. Что я могла сделать? Рассказать матери или отцу? Но они не верили мне. Вызвать полицию? Но Чарли Несбитт бы сказал, что его жена уехала. Никто мне не поверит!
Я наблюдала за домом мистера Келли. Его не было в поле зрения. Я подбежал к месту, где раздавались крики, и просто встала там. Крики прекратились. Было так тихо, я подумала, что не услышу крики снова. Все было кончено. Я опоздала. Я наклонилась и приложила ухо к земле.
И я услышала его, настолько слабый, что я едва смогла его различить. Женщина больше не кричала. Она пела. Что-то вроде: я любила тебя искренне, я любила тебя нежно. Это была грустная песня. Очень слабая. Все эти часы под землей должно быть свели ее с ума. Она просто продолжала петь, не желая больше кричать. Я послушала песню. Затем я повернулась и пошла прямо через минное поле к нашему дому.
«Отец», сказала я.
«Вот ты где», закричал он.
«Папа», сказала я. «Она больше не кричит».
«Не говори о ней!»
«Она теперь поет», заплакала я.
«Это не правда».
«Папа», сказал я, она там, и она скоро умрет, если ты не выслушаешь меня. Она там, и она поет. Вот что она поет». Я спела несколько слов — я любила тебя искренне, я любила тебя нежно.
«Где ты слышала эту песню?», прокричал он.
«На минном поле, прямо сейчас».
«Но это песня Хелен, которую она написала много лет назад для меня! Ты не можешь знать ее. Никто не знает кроме меня и Хелен. ЯЯ никогда не пел ее никому».
«Это правда», сказала я.
«О, боже!», закричал отец и выбежал из дома.
Наконец я увидела, что он был на минном поле, копал, и многие другие люди копали вместе с ним. Я чувствовала себя настолько счастливой, что мне хотелось плакать. Я набрала номер телефона, и когда Диппи ответил, я сказала: «Привет, Диппи. Все отлично. Все хорошо. Кричащая женщина больше не кричит».
«Здорово», сказал Диппи.
«Я буду ждать тебя на минном поле с лопатой через две минуты».
«Пока», прокричал Диппи.
«Пока, Диппи!», сказала я и побежала.