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Symbols of the USA

Symbols of the USA
National Symbols represent pride and values of the country.
The USA is third largest country by land area and world’s largest economy.
There are many symbols that represent the United States of America in general, but every state has its own flag, its own emblem and its own anthem too..
Here are a list of official United States national symbols:

Flag of the United States
Flag of the United States
The American flag is often called «The Stars and Stripes» (other names «Old Glory» and «The Star-Spangled Banner»).
It has 13 horizontal stripes,7 red and 6 white which stand for the original 13 states (thirteen British colonies that declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain and became the first states in the Union). In the top left hand corner there are 50 white stars on a blue background: one star for each state.

Seal of the United States (emblem)
Seal of the United States
The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States federal government. It was first used publicly in 1782.
The Great seal is used as the national coat of arms of the United States. It is officially used on documents such as United States passports, military insignia, embassy placards, and various flags.
Since 1935, both sides of the Great Seal have appeared on the reverse of the one-dollar bill. The Seal of the President of the United States is directly based on the Great Seal, and its elements are used in numerous government agency and state seals.

National bird: Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle
The Bald Eagle is the national bird of the USA and is represented on its Seal. In the late 20th century it was on the brink of extirpation in the continental United States. Populations recovered and the species was removed from the U.S. federal government’s list of endangered species on July 12, 1995 and transferred to the list of threatened species. It was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the Lower 48 States on June 28, 2007.
Bald Eagles are not actually bald, the name derives from an older meaning of «white headed».

National anthem: «The Star-Spangled Banner»
Star-Spangled Banner

Star-Spangled Banner
«The Star-Spangled Banner» is the national anthem of the United States of America. The lyrics come from «Defence of Fort McHenry», a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet, Francis Scott Key, after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812.
«The Star-Spangled Banner» was recognized for official use by the Navy in 1889, and by President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931, which was signed by President Herbert Hoover.

National mottos: «In God We Trust», «E Pluribus Unum»
«In God we trust» was adopted as the official motto of the United States in 1956 as an alternative or replacement to the unofficial motto of E pluribus unum, adopted when the Great Seal of the United States was created and adopted in 1782.
«In God we trust» has appeared on most U.S. coins since 1864 and on paper currency since 1957.
It is also the motto of the U.S. state of Florida. Its Spanish equivalent, En Dios Confiamos, is the motto of the Republic of Nicaragua.

National floral emblem: Rose
Rose
Rose is the National Flower of United States of America.
The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 159 accepted Rose as the National Floral Emblem of United States of America. On November 20, 1986 President Ronald Reagan proclaimed Rose as National Floral Emblem of United States of America.

National march: «The Stars and Stripes Forever»
Stars and Stripes Forever
«The Stars and Stripes Forever» is a patriotic American march widely considered to be the magnum opus of composer John Philip Sousa. By an act of the U.S. Congress, it is the official National March of the United States of America.

National creed: American’s Creed
National creed
The American’s Creed is the national creed of the United States of America. It was written in 1917 by William Tyler Page as an entry into a patriotic contest. It was adopted by the U.S. House of Representatives April 3, 1918.

Oak Tree is the National Tree of United States of America.
Oak Tree was adopted as the National Tree of United States in November 2004.
Oak Tree

Unofficial symbols
usa symbols
Native Americans
Native Americans

Native Americans
The terms used to refer to Native Americans have been controversial. According to a 1995 U.S. Census Bureau set of home interviews, most of the respondents with an expressed preference refer to themselves as American Indians (or simply Indians), and this term has been adopted by major newspapers and some academic groups

Currency of USA
Currency of USA
The United States Dollar is the official currency of United States of America. It is one of the highest traded and used currencies in international transactions and one of the world’s major reserve currencies. USD (United States Dollar) is also used by many other countries as official currency. The symbol of USD is $.

The Statue of Liberty is the symbol of American democracy.
Statue of Liberty
It stands on Liberty Island in New York. It is one of the first things people see when they arrive in New York by sea. This National Monument was a present from France to the USA. France gave the statue to America in 1884 as a symbol of friendship. Liberty carries the torch of freedom — in her right hand. In her left hand she is holding a tablet with the inscription «July 4, 1776» — American Independence Day.

The Washington Monument
Washington Monument
The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate the first American president, General George Washington. The monument is both the world’s tallest stone structure and the world’s tallest obelisk, standing 169.294 m. Construction of the monument began in 1848, but was halted from 1854 to 1877, and finally completed in 1884.

The Lincoln Memorial
Lincoln Memorial
The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon, the sculptor of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French, and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president.

The US Capitol
US Capitol
The United States Capitol is the meeting place of the United States Congress, the legislature of the federal government of the United States. Located in Washington, D.C., it sits atop Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall.
Officially, both the east and west sides of the Capitol are referred to as «fronts». Like the federal buildings for the executive and judicial branches, it is built in the distinctive neoclassical style and has a white exterior.

The White House
White House
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, D.C.. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.
The house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban, and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone in the Neoclassical style.

Independence Hall
Independence Hall
Independence Hall is the centerpiece of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It is known primarily as the location where both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and adopted.
The building was completed in 1753. It became the principal meeting place of the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1783 and was the site of the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787. The building is part of Independence National Historical Park and is listed as a World Heritage Site.

The Liberty Bell
Liberty Bell
The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The bell was commissioned from the London firm of Lester and Pack (today the Whitechapel Bell Foundry) in 1752, and was cast with the lettering «Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.» It originally cracked when first rung after arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the Liberty Bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens to public meetings and proclamations.

The Gateway Arch(in St. Louis, Missouri),
Gateway Arch
The Gateway Arch, or Gateway to the West, is an arch that is the centerpiece of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis, Missouri. It was built as a monument to the westward expansion of the United States. At 192 m, it is the tallest man-made monument in the United States.
The Gateway Arch was designed by Finnish-American architect Eero Saarinen and German-American structural engineer Hannskarl Bandel in 1947. Construction began on February 12, 1963, and ended on October 28, 1965. The monument opened to the public on June 10, 1967.

Mount Rushmore (carved on a mountain in South Dakota)
Mount Rushmore
The Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, in the United States. Sculpted by Danish-American Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum, Mount Rushmore features 60-foot (18 m) sculptures of the heads of four United States presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The entire memorial covers 1,278.45 acres (5.17 km2) and is 5,725 feet (1,745 m) above sea level.

The Pledge of Allegiance
Pledge of Allegiance
The Pledge of Allegiance of the United States is an expression of loyalty to the federal flag and the republic of the United States of America, originally composed by Francis Bellamy in 1892 and formally adopted by Congress as the pledge in 1942. The Pledge has been modified four times since its composition.

Yankee Doodle
Yankee Doodle
«Yankee Doodle» is a well-known Anglo-American song, the origin of which dates back to the Seven Years’ War. It is often sung patriotically in the United States today and is the state anthem of Connecticut. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 4501.

Uncle Sam (a cartoon figure designed by Thomas Nast),
Uncle Sam
Uncle Sam is a common national personification of the American government that, according to legend, came into use during the War of 1812 and was supposedly named for Samuel Wilson. The first use of Uncle Sam in literature was in the 1816 allegorical book The Adventures of Uncle Sam in Search After His Lost Honor by Frederick Augustus Fidfaddy, Esq. An Uncle Sam is mentioned as early as 1775, in the original «Yankee Doodle» lyrics of the Revolutionary War. The lyrics as a whole clearly deride the military efforts of the young nation, besieging the British at Boston. The 13th stanza is:
Old Uncle Sam come there to change
Some pancakes and some onions,
For ’lasses cakes, to carry home
To give his wife and young ones.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a national memorial in Washington, D.C. It honors U.S. service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for (Missing In Action) during the War.

The Jefferson Memorial
Jefferson Memorial
The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C. dedicated to Thomas Jefferson, an American Founding Father and the third President of the United States. The neoclassical building was designed by the architect John Russell Pope and built by the Philadelphia contractor John McShain. Construction of the building began in 1938 and was completed in 1943. The bronze statue of Jefferson was added in 1947.

The Golden Gate Bridge
Golden Gate Bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. It is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

and many others.
america
Source: 1, 2, 3.