Google+

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry


One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty- seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas.
Della felt so bad she sat down on their shabby little couch and cried, but that didn’t help either. Drying her eyes, she walked to the window of the small apartment. The furnished flat at eight dollars per week was all that she and her husband Jim could afford on his weekly salary of twenty dollars.
But tomorrow would be Christmas Day, and she had only $1.87 with which to buy Jim a present. She had been saving every penny she could for months, with this result. Twenty dollars a week doesn’t go far. Expenses had been greater than she had calculated. They always are. Only $1.87 to buy a present for her Jim. She had spent many a happy hour planning to buy something nice for him. If she had only been able to save more money, she could have bought something line and rare, something that deserved the honor of being owned by Jim.
Whirling from the window, she stood before the mirror. Her eyes were shining brilliantly, but her face had lost its color. Rapidly she pulled down her hair and let it fall to its full length.

Now, there were two possessions of the James Dillingham Youngs in which they both took great pride. One was Jim’s gold watch that had been his father’s and his grandfather’s. The other was Della’s hair.
Della’s beautiful hair fell about her, rippling and shining like a cascade of brown water. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. Then she did it up again nervously and quickly. Once she stopped for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet.
She quickly put on her old brown jacket and her old brown hat. With a whirl of skirts and with the brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she ran out the door and down the stairs to the street.
She walked down the street until she saw a sign which read: “Madam Sofronie. Hair. Goods of All Kinds. Second Floor.» Della ran up the stairs, arriving at the top panting.
Entering the small shop on the second floor, she was greeted by a large, pale lady.
«Will you buy my hair?” asked Della.
“I buy hair.» said Madame. “Take your hat off and let’s have a look at it.»
Down rippled the brown cascade.
“Twenty dollars.» said Madame, lifting the mass with a practiced hand.
“Give it to me quick,» said Della.
She passed the next two hours ecstatically, searching the stores for Jim’s present.
She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else. There was no other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of them inside out. It was a platinum watch chain, simple and clean in design, but of obvious quality. As soon as she saw it, she knew that it must be Jim’s. She had often seen Jim look at his watch secretly because he didn’t want anyone to see the old leather strap that he used in place of a chain. If Jim had had that chain on his watch, he would have been proud to check the time in any company. They took twenty-one dollars from her for the chain, and she hurried home with the 87 cents change.
Reaching home, Della got out her curling irons and went to work fixing her short hair. Soon her head was covered with tiny, close-lying curls that made her look wonderfully like a young schoolgirl.
Looking at her reflection in the mirror, she said to herself: “If Jim doesn’t kill me before he takes a second look at me, he’ll say I look like a Coney Island chorus girl. But what could I do — oh! what could I do with a dollar and eighty-seven cents? I had to cut my hair. If I hadn’t cut it I wouldn’t have been able to buy Jim a present.’’
At seven o’clock the coffee was made and the frying pan was on the back of the stove, hot and ready to cook the chops.
Jim was never late. Clutching the watch chain in her hand Della sat on the corner of the table near the door. Hearing his step on the stair, she turned white for just a moment. Remembering her short hair, she whispered: “Please, God, make him think I am still pretty.”
The door opened and Jim stepped in. He looked thin and very serious. Poor fellow, he was only twenty-two — and to be burdened with a family! He needed a new overcoat, and he was without gloves.
Stopping inside the door, he fixed his eyes on Della, and there was an expression in them that she could not read, and it terrified her. It was not anger, nor surprise, nor disapproval, nor horror. He simply stared at her with a peculiar expression on his face.
Running up to him Della cried, “Jim, darling, don’t look at me that way. I had my hair cut off and sold it because I couldn’t have lived through Christmas if I hadn’t given you a present. I just had to do it. It’ll grow out again — you won’t mind, will you? My hair grows awfully fast. Say ‘Merry Christmas!’ Jim, and let’s be happy. You don’t know what a nice — what a beautiful, nice gift I’ve got for you.»
“You’ve cut off your hair?” asked Jim.
“Cut it off and sold it.” said Della. “Don’t you like me just as well, anyhow? I’m me without my hair, amn’t I?”
Jim looked about the room curiously.
“You say your hair is gone?” he said, with an air almost of idiocy.
“You needn’t look for it,” said Della. “It’s sold, I tell you — sold and gone, too. It’s Christmas Eve, darling. Be good to me. Maybe the hairs of my head were numbered,” she went on with a sudden serious sweetness, “but nobody could ever count my love for you. Shall I put the chops on, Jim?”
Jim seemed to wake out of his trance, quickly hugging his Della. He drew a package from his overcoat pocket and threw it upon the table.
“Don’t make any mistake, Dell,” he said, “about me. I don’t think there’s anything in the way of a haircut or a shave or a shampoo that could make me love you any less. But if you’ll unwrap that package, you may see why I was so startled.”
Ripping open the package Della screamed with joy when she saw the present it contained. But then her cry of joy quickly changed to hysterical sobs as she held her husband’s gift.
There lay the set of combs that Della had worshipped for so long in a Broadway window. They were expensive combs, she knew, and her heart had simply craved and yearned over them without the least hope of possession. And now they were hers, but the long tresses that they were meant for were gone now.
Hugging them to her bosom, at length she was able to look up with dim eyes and a smile and say: “My hair grows so fast, Jim! I’m sorry I cut it. I would never have done it if I had known you were giving me the combs, but I had to because… Oh. Oh!”
Remembering her present Della jumped up and held it out to him eagerly in her open hand.
“Isn’t it a dandy, Jim? I hunted all over town to find it. You’ll have to look at your watch a hundred times a day now. Give it to me. I want to see how it looks with the chain on it.”
Instead of obeying, Jim tumbled down on the couch and put his hands behind his head and smiled.
“Dell,” said he, “let’s put our Christmas presents away and keep them a while. They’re too nice to use just now. I sold the watch to get the money to buy your combs. And now suppose you put the chops on.»

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry


Дары волхвов (О. Генри)

Один доллар и восемьдесят семь центов. Это все. И шестьдесят центов из этого было в пенни. Делла пересчитала три раза. Один доллар и восемьдесят семь центов. А на следующий день Рождество.
Делла почувствовала себя так плохо, что она села на старенькую кушетку и заплакала, но это не помогло. Вытерев глаза, она подошла к окну маленькой квартиры. Меблированная квартира за восемь долларов в неделю было все, что она и ее муж Джим могли позволить себе на свою еженедельную зарплату в двадцать долларов.
Но завтра будет Рождество, а у нее только один доллар и восемьдесят семь центов, чтобы купить Джиму подарок. Она экономила каждый пенни, который только могла, в течение нескольких месяцев, и вот результат. На двадцать долларов в неделю далеко не уедешь. Расходы были больше, чем она считала. Так всегда. Только один доллар и восемьдесят семь центов, чтобы купить ее Джиму подарок. Она провела много счастливых часов, планируя купить что-нибудь приятное для него. Если бы только она только смогла сэкономить больше денег, она могла бы купить что-нибудь редкое, то, что имело честь принадлежать Джиму.
Отвернувшись от окна, она встала перед зеркалом. Ее глаза ярко сияли, но ее лицо потеряло свой цвет. Поспешно она распустила волосы, позволив им ниспадать по ее спине.
У четы Джеймса Диллинэма Младших было два сокровища, которыми они оба гордились. Одним из них были золотые часы Джима, которые принадлежали его отцу и деду. А другое — волосы Деллы.
Красивые волосы Деллы окутали ее, волнистые и сияющие, как каскад коричневых вод. Они были до колена и практически могли служить ей одеждой. Затем она снова заколола их нервно и быстро. Лишь на миг она остановилась, и слезинка или две упали на изношенную красную ковровую дорожку.
Она быстро надела старый коричневый жакет и свою старую коричневую шляпу. В вихре юбок и с бриллиантовым блеском в глазах, она побежала к двери и выскочила на улицу.
Она шла по улице, пока она не увидела вывеску, на которой было написано: «Мадам Софрони. Волосы. Товары всех видов. Второй этаж». Делла побежала вверх по лестнице, и, задыхаясь, достигла нужной двери.
Входя в небольшой магазин на втором этаже, она была встречена большой, бледной леди.
«Вы купите мои волосы?», спросила Делла.
«Я покупаю волосы», сказала мадам. «Снимите свою шляпу и позвольте взглянуть на них».
Коричневый каскад хлынул вниз.
«Двадцать долларов», сказала мадам, поднимая волосы опытной рукой.
«Давайте мне их быстро», сказала Делла.
Следующие два часа она провела, восторженно гуляя по магазинам в поисках подарка для Джима.
Наконец она нашла его. Он, безусловно, был сделан для Джима и ни для кого другого. Не было ничего подобного ни в одном из магазинов, а она буквально вывернула их наизнанку. Это была платиновая цепочка для часов, простого дизайна, но отличного качества. Как только она увидела ее, она знала, что она должна принадлежать Джиму. Она часто видела, как Джим украдкой смотрел на часы, потому что он не хотел, чтобы кто-либо увидел старый кожаный ремешок, используемый вместо цепочки. Если бы у Джима была эта цепочка на часах, то он был бы горд, посмотреть время в любой компании. Продавец взял двадцать один доллар за цепочку, и она спешила домой со сдачей в восемьдесят семь центов.
Придя домой, Делла достала щипцы для завивки и приступила к укладке своих коротких волос. Вскоре ее голова была покрыта крошечными, близко расположенными завитками, которые делали ее похожей на молодую школьницу.
Глядя на свое отражение в зеркале, она сказала себе: «Если Джим не убьет меня, прежде чем он второй раз взглянет на меня, он скажет, что я похожа на девушку из хора Кони-Айленд. Но что я могла сделать, о, что я могла сделать, имея в наличии один доллар и восемьдесят центов? Мне пришлось отрезать мои волосы. Если бы я их не обстригла, я бы не смогла купить Джиму подарок».
В семь часов кофе был приготовлен, и сковорода стояла на краю плиты, горячая и готовая, чтобы готовить отбивные.
Джим никогда не опаздывал. Сжимая цепочку для часов в своей руке Делла села на угол стола рядом с дверью. Услышав его шаги на лестнице, она побелела на мгновение. Вспоминая свои короткие волосы, она прошептала: «Пожалуйста, Боже, заставь его думать, что я все еще симпатичная».
Дверь открылась, и Джим зашел. Он выглядел худым и очень серьезным. Бедняга, ему было всего двадцать два — и быть обременены семьей! Ему нужен новый плащ, и он был без перчаток.
Остановившись в дверях, он посмотрел на Деллу, в его глазах было такое выражение, которое она не могла прочитать и которое пугало ее. Это ни гнев, ни удивление, ни неодобрение, ни ужас. Он просто смотрел на нее со странным выражением на лице.
Подбежав к нему Делла заплакала: «Джим, милый, не смотри на меня так. Я обрезала и продала свои волосы, потому что я не могла не сделать тебе подарок на Рождество. И просто обязана была это сделать. Они отрастут снова, ты же не будешь возражать? Мои волосы растут ужасно быстро. Джим, скажи «С Рождеством» и давай будем счастливы. Ты же не знаешь какой приятный, какой красивый подарок я тебе приготовила».
«Ты отрезала волосы?», спросил Джим.
«Отрезала и продала», сказала Делла. «Я тебе теперь не нравлюсь как раньше? Я осталась собой без моих волос, не так ли?»
Джим оглядел комнату с любопытством.
«Ты говоришь, твоих волос нет», сказал он, и это казалось почти идиотизмом.
«Тебе не стоит искать их», сказала Делла. «Они проданы. Я же говорю, они проданы и их нет. Это Рождество, дорогой. Будь добр ко мне. Может быть, волосы на моей голове можно посчитать», продолжала она с внезапной серьезной сладостью, «но никто не может сосчитать мою любовь к тебе. Я положу отбивные, Джим?»
Джим, казалось, вышел из транса, быстро обнимая свою Деллу. Он достал пакет из кармана пальто и бросил его на стол.
«Не ошибайся на мой счет, Дел», сказал он. «Я не думаю, что любая стрижка или бритье или шампунь, заставят меня любить тебя меньше. Но если ты развернешь этот пакет, ты поймешь, почему я был так поражен».
Открывая пакет, Делла вскрикнула от радости, когда увидела, какой там был подарок. Но затем ее крик радости быстро сменился истерическими рыданиями, когда она держала подарок мужа.
Там лежал набор расчесок, которым Делла так долго восхищалась, рассматривая его в витрине на Бродвее. Это были дорогие расчески, она знала, и ее сердце просто сжималось от того, что она никогда не сможет иметь такие. И теперь они принадлежали ей, но длинных локонов, для которых они предназначены, теперь нет.
Прижимая их к груди, она посмотрела мутными глазами и с улыбкой сказала: «Мои волосы растут так быстро, Джим! Я сожалею, что остригла их. Я бы никогда этого не сделала, если бы знала, что ты подаришь мне расчески, но мне пришлось, потому что … ох. Ой!».
Вспомнив о своем подарке, Делла вскочила и протянула к нему свою раскрытую ладонь.
«Разве это не стильно, Джим? Я ее искала по всему городу. Теперь ты будешь смотреть на свои часы сто раз в день. Дай мне их. Я хочу посмотреть, как они будут выглядеть с цепочкой».
Вместо того чтобы подчиняться, Джим повалился на диван, положил руки за голову и улыбнулся.
«Делл», сказал он, «давай отложим наши рождественские подарки. Они слишком хороши, чтобы использовать их сейчас. Я продал часы, чтобы выручить деньги и купить тебе расчески. А сейчас, я полагаю, пора подавать отбивные».